About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the u.s. is just 53 days to falling off that fiscal cliff. today, president obama is going to deliver a big speech about the economy. one of the main components of the president's spending plan is higher tax rates for the wealthy. that's something that house speaker john boehner doesn't seem to be buying. listen. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. and, frankly, it couldn't even pass the house. i'm not sure it could pass the senate. >> without a budget compromise, drastic cuts amendmently kick in. that, of course, could send the economy spiraling back into a recession. white house correspondent brianna keilar is live for us this morning from washington. john boehner was the guy who said he didn't think a lame duck congress could do big things. what can be done in the next, what did i say, 53 days? >> well, maybe finding some sort of stopgap measure. some sort of framework on tax reform, soledad. i think that's the goal here. the fact is, house republicans and president obama and senate democrats, they don't really have a choice. they have to do something, and that became very clear
the u.s., as long as the country continues on its path to democracy. cnn's jessica yellin is traveling with the president. she joins us live from yangon in myanmar. this was a historic visit. what has been the response there. >> hi, john. the response has been very warm. obviously the people we're seeing are people who want to come out and embrace the president's message. but he spoke here in this auditorium, at an historic site, to 1500 students and professionals. people who are pro-democracy, advocates, and regular citizens who just wanted to hear his message. he got a very warm reception here and the white house said that he was moved, as well, by the thousands of people who came out to greet him on the road outside the airport when he arrived. the airport gave an address in which he acknowledged that democracies are sometimes difficult and it's a struggle to get to full freedom. but he said that it is, of course, worth the effort. and he also made clear that it isn't just a visit of goodwill, it also has strategic significance with a message to another nation in the area. listen to
delivery routes, and 570 bakery stores throughout the u.s. this is a story, you know, people make light of it, you're going to get your twinkies. this is a story about people and their jobs. 18,000 people. for some of those towns where the hostess factory for the wonder bread factory and bakery are really an important part of the economy. so we wish everybody the best. >> hopeful they'll be able -- the people want their jobs. this looks like the people who own the company really wanted to continue to make this iconic brand. >> if investors could buy it maybe they could keep some of those factories running. some of those factories quite frankly are pretty old and inefficient. so we'll see. >> christine, thank you for the update. still ahead we continue to follow the breaking news out of tel aviv the bomb blast on that bus this morning. ruin any chances for a de-escalation which is what they've been talking about. we're going to be chatting with the ambassador stuart holliday ahead. then the republican tradition the iowa straw poll. why is the state's governor saying, eh, kind of useless.
time tomorrow. that jobless rate is forecast to rise slightly to 7.9%. >>> u.s. stock markets reopened yesterday after being closed two days. and they closed mixed on the day. home depot and lowe's both rose, no surprise there. this morning, u.s. stock futures are trading mixed. there are several key economic reports today. jobless claims, construction spending, auto sales, and we're getting a lot of earnings. a lot going on in markets, even as investors in people's 401(k)s are trying to dig out. and it's costing new york city $200 million a day in permanently lost economic activity. >> what are you adding up there? >> that's all the lost business, and that's not even counting, i think, the damage that's going to have to be fixed. this is lost economic activity. this is according to the new york city comptroller's office. businesses, of course, scrambling for fuels, for cars, for generators. logistics are a mess, employees are displaced, customers are displaced, lost productivity, business not getting done, contracts being lost. you get it. >> not even cleanup numbers yet. >> not even
. the u.s. congressional delegation and the state house assembly. so the fact is republicans control the government at all levels by big numbers. and i think that this election is going to be much more like 2010 than 2008. i think governor romney's going to carry pennsylvania. >> ron brownstein you agree with that? >> the big question is as you come down to the very end, where republicans are viewing this, is this electorate going to be like the electorate in 2010. racial distribution, partisan distribution, in it's ideological distribution? 2010 was more white, more republican and more conservative. southwest pennsylvania is going to be very tough for president obama. the white working-class voters there are going to move sharply away from him. but what pat toomey did in 2010 was cut the margin in the poor suburban counties outside of philadelphia to only 20,000 vote deficit. in 2008 barack obama won those same counties by 200,000 votes. the question is whether the social issues that are partient in for romney with white collar, white voters, particularly women are going to be a bar
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)